Book Blogging 101 | How to Write Reviews Like a Queen 

  
The first step to writing reviews like a queen (aka me. confidence, darling) you must plan your basic structure. I find that there are generally two main types of reviews:

  • Short and sweet. These reviews are on a strictly need-to-know basis, they essentially tell you whether you should read the book or not, careful to stay away from even the smallest spoilers. Looking for examples? See all of my reviews here: Bookish Reviews. Shameless self-promotion and I’m not even sorry.
  • Reviews twice the size of a novel. These reviews are long, really long. They tell you everything you wanted and didn’t know you needed to know. Because they’re generally going to be completely analyzing a book, these will likely include a few very minor spoilers. If you’re looking for examples, check out Joey @ thoughts and afterthoughts’ review. I don’t know he can write so much about a book. Not that I’m complaining.

You should choose the basic structure that flatters your writing style. For example, I have the habit of taking information and squeezing it down to be explained in the fewest possible words. (Which is great when I’m have to write a one-pager, not so much when I’m assigned 20 pages.) Because of this, my reviews end up very concise. If you’re more detail-oriented and like to write about every aspect of a book, longer reviews are the right choice for you. 

  
Now that you’ve got your basic structure, you’ve got to organize it.

Example time!

Bad:

The writing was very beautiful. The action was rickety. I really got invested in the characters. Bananas! 

I really liked the poeticness of the writing. My favorite character was Soap.

Better:

The writing was very beautiful, I really like the poeticness of it.

I really got invested in the characters. My favorite character was Soap.

Unfortunately, the action was rickety.

Bananas!

What I’m trying to say is whether your reviews are long or short, you need have similar ideas about the book grouped together. So instead of talking about the writing then the action then the characters then the writing then the characters, talking about the writing in one section, characters in the next, and action last.

Bonus points for organization? Transitions!

Example time once more!

Bad:

Writing was bad. It really made everything fake, I couldn’t enjoy it at all.

Action was nice. Those scenes were well-thought out.

Better:

Writing was bad. Because it made everything fake, I couldn’t enjoy it at all.

However, the action was nice. Those scenes were well-thought out.

Do you see what I’m saying? Transitions really make everything clearer and more organized.

Want to go even further than transitions? Use sections!

Example time again woohoo!

Transitions:

I loved the way the writer pieced every word together, it was poetic and brilliant.

Unfortunately, the characters weren’t well-thought out. They were one-dimensional and all alike.

Even worse, I had significant problems with the plot. It was messy and hard to follow. By the end of the book I hardly knew what I had been reading for the last 20 pages.

Sections:

Writing:

I loved the way the writer pieced every word together, it was poetic and brilliant.

Characters:

Unfortunately, the characters weren’t well-thought out. They were one-dimensional and all alike.

Plot:

Even worse, I had significant problems with the plot. It was messy and hard to follow. By the end of the book I hardly knew what I had been reading for the last 20 pages.

Though it’s not essential, sectioning your reviews makes them even more organized.

If you really want to take the prize home for organization then use the following tips:

Put key words in bold or italics.

  • Use bullet lists or
  1. Numbered lists 

Put quotes or book synopsis in highlights

Then you’ll be the Queen Bee of organization 100% guaranteed.

  
This is the most basic rule of writing reviews and also a given for you. (I hope) One time I saw a post that actually said: This review has not been proofread, sorry for the typos.

Are you serious?

This brings me to my new reviewing motto: Don’t proofread? Then don’t post.

Of course we all miss a typo, I’ve done that, quite embarrassingly, numerous times. But that’s not what proofreading is about, not completely anyway. Proofreading is a symbol that you’re willing to put that extra time into your reviews, that you really want to produce the best posts you can. If you’re not willing to do that, then why have a blog? 

 
Believe in yourself, because you’re a Queen Bee too! 

When reviewing, the best thing to do is let your voice shine through. Write the way you write, analyze a book the way you analyze a book. If you try to imitate someone else or try to impress another in writing your reviews, it’s just not going to work. Let yourself shine and the rest will follow.

Other Book Blogging 101 posts: Click Here!

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